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'Plight of women in India is bad'

 
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West Coast Tiger
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PostPosted: Sun Jun 25, 2006 8:36 am    Post subject: 'Plight of women in India is bad' Reply with quote

'Plight of women in India is bad'

Quote:
New Delhi - One woman is raped every 30 minutes in India, while one is killed every 75 minutes - most often burned to death for not bringing a large enough dowry.

Violence against children rose by nearly a quarter in 2004 and recorded cases of female foeticide increased by half, according to the National Crime Records Bureau (NCRB).

...

India's National Commission for Women said the statistics were not surprising.

"The plight of women in India is bad," said Yasmin Abrar, a member of the commission. "We have been fighting in many ways to improve their situation."

Children are the other big victims of crimes and, according to the figures, 24 percent more cases against them were reported in 2004 than in the year before.



More at the link.
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West Coast Tiger
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PostPosted: Fri Jun 30, 2006 9:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

The 'curse' of having a girl

Quote:
If our baby is a girl - her arrival is likely to be greeted, by some, with condolences. A friend - delighted with his new daughter soon became infuriated at comments that his home had been cursed with a girl.

"Relatives arrived laden with gifts of sweet meats," he said. "They cuddled her and shook their heads at our misfortune."

...

The prospect of paying a dowry and knowing a daughter could never generate the income of a son is enough for some families to commit murder.

In my parents' native Punjab, girls are often killed at birth. It has skewed the ratio of girls to boys so much that some villages have not seen the birth of a female in years. Thousands of men in rural areas now have trouble finding a wife.

I remember the stories my mother told me - of the neighbour who would take baby girls in the middle of the night and drown them in the village well. My mother also told me how guilty and how much of a failure she was made to feel when I arrived a year after my older sister.

It is not only in the countryside that daughters are unwanted. Middle class, educated women are often at the front of the queue to terminate.



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West Coast Tiger
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 04, 2006 3:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Prostitution high in India: Survey


Quote:
From poverty to erosion of values, several factors are pushing more and more women and young girls to take to prostitution all over India, says a new study.

Although it is difficult to count the total number of prostitutes, or sex workers, latest estimates show that there are some three million in the country, an overwhelming majority in the 15-35 year group.

KK Mukherjee and Sutapa Mukherjee say in the study undertaken by the Gram Niyojan Kendra, Ghaziabad, on behalf of the central government that there were several reasons why prostitution is growing.

Among these are growing migration and poverty, political instability, erosion of traditional values, desire to earn easy money, globaliasation and declining job opportunities for uneducated and unskilled youths.

Added to these are urbanisation, new attitudes to sex, apprehension among youths about their sexual performance, rise in hospitality industries, promiscuity as well as myths about sex with virgin women.



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PostPosted: Tue Jul 04, 2006 3:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

'Women are easy prey in MedEd'

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MUMBAI: Last week's incident, in which student activists blackened the face of a Wilson College professor who was accused of molesting a girl student, has revived the discussion about sexual harassment in colleges, with many students and teachers saying the harassment is at its worst in medical colleges.

With a rigid hierarchy in place and poorly functioning redressal mechanisms, girl students, interns and female professors make easy victims in these institutions.

In 2002, at the behest of the state women's commission, the SNDT University Research Centre for Women's Studies and the India Centre for Human Rights and Law conducted a study at J J Hospital and its affiliate, the Grant Medical College, giving detailed questionnaires to 710 women.

The findings showed that over 25% of the women at JJ—including doctors, nurses, interns, medical students and paramedical staff—had experienced sexual harassment, including verbal harassment, touching, passes, lewd remarks and also molestation.


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 16, 2006 2:56 pm    Post subject: Over five million illegal abortions in India every year Reply with quote

Hindustan Times: Over five million illegal abortions in India every year


Quote:
India records a whopping 5.7 million illegal abortions every year and over 80 per cent of pregnant women do not get hygienic antenatal care, say experts.

"Every year 6.7 million abortions take place in India but the sad part is that 5.7 millions are illegal. The place and technique used in most of the illegal cases are unsafe and unhygienic," said Sudha Tewari, President of Parivar Seva Sanstha, an NGO working closely with the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare.

"The result is obvious - India has a steep maternal mortality rate of 498 per 100,000 women, which is very high as compared to other countries," Tewari said. She said her organisation carried out 15 percent of the legal abortions in the country.

...

Tewari, who is also the head of Advocating Reproductive Choices (ARC), a conglomerate of NGOs working in the field of reproductive health, said the acceptance of various contraceptive methods was still not widespread.

"While less than 50 per cent of women use oral contraceptives in India, the use of intra uterine devices (IUD) is a meagre 1.6 per cent as compared to over 40 percent in China," she pointed out.

...

"India must expand the number of contraceptive methods to stop unwanted pregnancies and illegal abortions," she said.


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Tehanu
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PostPosted: Sat Jul 28, 2007 3:01 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

India's first female president, Pratibha Patil, was sworn in on Wednesday.

Quote:
... "Today India stands at the threshold of a new era of progress," she said. "We must make sure that every section of society, particularly the weak and disadvantaged, are equal partners and beneficiaries in the development process."

But her words may count for little given her lack of power and the manner of her accession to the job.

The governor of Rajasthan, she had been plucked from relative obscurity to become the government's compromise candidate for the job, after the coalition failed to agree on a host of other, male candidates.

... Patil ... urged a renewed battle on malnutrition, infant mortality and female foeticide -- in a country where hundreds of thousands of female foetuses are killed every year and nearly half of all young children are malnourished.


Reuters India.

In the meantime, there's another issue in India for women, and that is the plight of widows, who are often abandoned by their families and have to survive with little or no resources. Many make their way to one place, Vrindavan, which is now being call the "city of widows."

Quote:
... The study, funded by the United Nations women's organisation Unifem, found it was poverty, and not spirituality, that was driving women to Vrindavan.

The report said that poor and helpless women went to the northern city to escape "humiliation and dependence".

Nearly 15,000 widows are believed to be living on the streets of Vrindavan.


BBC News
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leftcoastguy
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 19, 2007 10:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

How short-sighted can people be anyways?

I remember reading a Gwynne Dyer article about a similiar situation in China and what this kind of behaviour is going to lead to down the line when all these excess males want to mate and get married. There will not be enough women available.

Seeing as India and China are the most populated countries on the planet this has consequences for the entire planet, including us here in Canada.

Maybe Canadian doctors could start an international campaign aginst their fellow doctors in India that are promoting this insanity! Idea

Quote:
Yet there is one problem that prosperity is actually aggravating.

I saw this for myself in a hospital in Punjab, where we filmed a young mother giving birth, with the help of a surgeon's scalpel, to her second daughter.

The Caesarean section was a complete success, and the safe arrival of such a beautiful ball of life should have been greeted with uncomplicated delight.

But the mother had failed once again to provide her husband with a son and heir, so it was a singularly joyless occasion.


Old attitudes


Handed the little girl, not yet 10 minutes old, the women of the family were disapproving and edgy, fretful perhaps of how they would break the news to the men folk, who had not even come to the hospital.

On the maternity ward a few minutes later, I was asked by one of the ladies - the mother's sister, I think - whether we would like to name the baby girl.

We demurred, of course. Then came an even more extraordinary request: did we want to take the baby, not just to hold, but to have?

In another time, she might have been killed.

For this prosperous Punjabi family, we seemingly offered a less savage means of disposal.

In modern-day India, sex selection, the all-too-common practice by which female foetuses are terminated before birth, conforms to a very different and disturbing calculus: increased wealth brings increased access to prenatal ultrasounds and sonograms.

New and more widely available technology, the engine of India's relentless economic growth, is also fuelling female foeticide.


Quote:
More distressing still, sex selection is worst in the most affluent parts of the country: Punjab, Haryana, Gujarat.

In northern Punjab, for example, there are just 798 girls under the age of six for every 1,000 boys. The national average is 927.

Even though it is illegal in India for a doctor to reveal the gender of an unborn child, the law is rarely enforced.

Over the past 20 years, it has been estimated that some 10 million female foetuses have been aborted.

Girls are unwanted because they are seen as a financial burden. Landholdings can pass to in-laws and dowries, which themselves are illegal, siphon money from families.

First birthday

Why pay 50,000 rupees to your new in-laws when you can pay 500 rupees for an abortion? You do not even have to leave home.

Many unscrupulous doctors carry portable ultra-sound equipment in the boots of their cars.

Increased consumer choice is one of the hallmarks of the new India.

Tragically, it is being applied, with almost industrial efficiency, to depress the female birth rate.



Girls at risk amid India's prosperity

India is in the throes of a revolution of rising expectations, a country animated by a providential sense of its own possibility.

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Oh_CanaBa
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 20, 2007 1:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This certainly refutes my theory of paying attention to only Canada. This is disgusting.

Last edited by Oh_CanaBa on Tue Aug 21, 2007 12:49 am; edited 2 times in total
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ickydicky
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 21, 2007 12:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

If you have something useful to say in the feminism forum don't hold back. Otherwise take your stupid sarcasm somewhere else.
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Oh_CanaBa
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PostPosted: Tue Aug 21, 2007 12:46 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

ickydicky wrote:
If you have something useful to say in the feminism forum don't hold back. Otherwise take your stupid sarcasm somewhere else.


Point taken, I will edit my post. I'm assuming you're addressing my post as in retrospect I see how it reads bad. I meant well.
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Palamedes
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2007 5:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well,

Logically,

A shortage of women will happen. As such, men in India are going to have a difficult time finding a wife. As a result, the market equilibrium will shift. Why should the parents give a dowry if there are 20 guys who all want to marry their daughter?

Instead, I think you might see a reverse dowry develop where the men's family pay the woman's family for the honour of marrying their daughter.

Then you might see male children getting killed or aborted.
And then it goes back and forth until the dowry concept is abandoned.

Unforunately, all of that is going to take far too long to happen.
It would be much easier if the government simply passed some laws to give women equality, outlaw dowrys, and set about ensuring that women had equal opportunities and ambition in the workplace.
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Factotum
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2007 5:38 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Palamedes wrote:
It would be much easier if the government simply passed some laws to give women equality, outlaw dowrys, and set about ensuring that women had equal opportunities and ambition in the workplace.

The dowry has been outlawed in India since the 1960's. Clearly, this law hasn't done a whole lot.
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The Evil Twin
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2007 6:31 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Quote:
The dowry has been outlawed in India since the 1960's. Clearly, this law hasn't done a whole lot.


Unfortunately true. India does have strong democratic traditions and a legal system based on English Common Law. It has also been led by nominally leftwing social democratic governments (except for 1998 - 2004 when the rightwing BJP ruled) over the last 60 years. It does have strong laws against the dowry system, sexual harassment, so-called "honour killings", female infanticide, aborting of female fetuses, etc. Unfortunately, enforcement of the law is almost nonexistent due to cultural attitudes and police looking the other way. I fear that unless India undergoes the same type of cultural and sexual changes that the West underwent in 1960s (in terms of civil rights for women and sexual/racial minorities), nothing will ever change. The politicians will posture and pass all kinds of laws "outlawing" this or that type of discrimination, but in rural India, life will continue as it always has for the last 5000 years or so: IOW a caste based sexist patriarchy dominated by upperclass/uppercaste feudal landowners. Sad
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bshmr
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PostPosted: Fri Aug 24, 2007 10:49 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

And, sitll there are reports of widows throwing themselves on funeral pyres, etc.
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PostPosted: Sat Aug 25, 2007 3:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Palamedes wrote:
Well,

Logically,

A shortage of women will happen. As such, men in India are going to have a difficult time finding a wife. As a result, the market equilibrium will shift. Why should the parents give a dowry if there are 20 guys who all want to marry their daughter?

Instead, I think you might see a reverse dowry develop where the men's family pay the woman's family for the honour of marrying their daughter.

Then you might see male children getting killed or aborted.


There are already shortages of women. Look at China. Many men have a difficult time finding a wife. And you're right that a sort of reverse dowry has developed, with men buying a wife, although some prefer to just abduct one.

But I don't understand the bit about honour. Why ascribe such noble intentions to the transaction?
And even though there's been a female shortage for some time, (this 2001 link mentions a 1998 abduction), the preference for male children seems as entrenched as ever. We won't be seeing males aborted or killed to correct the oversupply, because males are still valued more, regardless of how many there are relative to women. There are factors other than supply that determine the value or worth. Do you think what's behind the abortion/killing of females is a correction of the male/female ratio?
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PostPosted: Sun Aug 26, 2007 10:55 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Crisis looms as 18 million Chinese can't find a wife


Fears of sexual turmoil and 'bachelor villages'

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 27, 2007 9:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

An in-depth article over at CBC ... including how violence against women can occur in some Indo-Canadian families.

Quote:
... A UNICEF report in 2000 stated 45 per cent of married men in the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh acknowledged physically abusing their wives during marriage.

That same report states that 5,000 women are killed by their husbands and in-laws each year in "accidental" kitchen fires. Other killings take the form of acid attacks and honour killings. Yet other atrocious behaviour plaguing some Indian women includes bride burning, female infanticide, eviction of widows and murders over dowry issues.

Prominent Indian lawyer and activist Indira Jaising said earlier this year in an interview that domestic violence is so pervasive in Indian society that it's difficult to talk about other issues, such as education or employment for women, when many are so trapped by abuse.

Jaising and women's groups in India have been instrumental in forcing the government to pass the Protection of Women from Domestic Violence Act, which became law two years ago. While it protects women from violence, the country still has no law against marital rape.

Abuse of south Asian women isn't just confined to India and Pakistan. When immigrants seek a new life in Canada, sometimes the old traditions die hard. In the past year, several B.C. women of Indo-Canadian descent have died as a result of domestic violence. They include Manjit Panghali, a young mother whose body was found burned in October by a roadside in Delta. Her husband, Mukhtiar Panghali, was charged in connection with her death. That same month, Navreet Kaur Waraich, the mother of a four-month-old boy, was stabbed to death in Surrey. Her husband, Jatinder, has been charged. Gurjeet Kaur Ghuman was blinded after being shot in the face by her husband, who then killed himself. Sadeqa Siddiqui, co-ordinator of Montreal's South Asian Community Women's Centre, says, "The problem is that women are considered second-class citizens. This is a male society — men are ruling."
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Tehanu
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 06, 2011 5:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

This is bizarre ... apparently some doctors are gender reassigning baby girls so that their parents can have a son. Um, really? I find the story quite unbelievable, frankly.

Quote:
Madhya Pradesh state government is investigating claims that up to 300 girls were surgically turned into boys in one city after their parents paid about Ł2,000 each for the operations.

... India's gender balance has already been tilted in favour of boys by female foeticide – sex selection abortions - by families who fear the high marriage costs and dowries they may have to pay. There are now seven million more boys than girls aged under six in the country.

... The row emerged after newspapers disclosed children from throughout India were being operated on by doctors in Indore, Madhya Pradesh.


The Telegraph via Feministing.
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